No-Fail No-Pound Sauerkraut

photo of jar of sauerkraut

“In a small but profound way, getting involved with fermenting food in your home is a way to embrace the bacterial allies that are all around us. And rather than getting caught up in the foolish, indiscriminate war on bacteria, we can embrace the bacteria around us and turn them into our physiological allies.”
~ Sandor Ellix Katz


Sauerkraut Power

  • Digestive Enzymes: Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride introduces sauerkraut from day one on the GAPS Diet. Why is she such a strong proponent of this old-fashioned food? Because it’s one of the strongest natural digestive enzymes in existence. Advertisements for Tums antacids will have you believe that the majority of people suffer from an overabundance of stomach acid, when actually the reverse is true. A deficiency in stomach acid makes food take longer to digest (and often incompletely digest), causing the symptoms that make Tums a bestseller. In addition, there’s a domino effect in our digestive system, where one digestive process leads to the next. When we eat, the natural production of stomach acid stimulates the release of digestive enzymes from the pancreas and gallbladder into the small intestine. Together, they break down our food into absorbable nutrients. When stomach acid production is faulty, the other enzymes get released in smaller quantities as well, adding to our digestive woes. A little bit of sauerkraut before a meal stimulates the production of stomach acid (and therefore our other enzymes), preparing our body for the meal to come.
  • Probiotics: If you’ve ever bought a probiotic supplement, you’ve seen the word lactobacilli. These bacteria exist on the surface of all living things (including cabbage) and during fermentation, they break down the starch and sugar in the cabbage and produce lactic acid, which is a natural preservative. That is how people thousands of years ago were able to preserve food without the use of refrigeration. At the same time, the lactobacilli multiply during fermentation, making sauerkraut a potent ally for our health. In our digestive tract, they: (1) protect us against viruses, pathogens and harmful bacteria; (2) help maintain a healthy internal pH; (3) neutralize toxins; (4) chelate heavy metals; (5) suppress cancer formation; (6) convert food into nutrition for the cells of our intestinal walls; and (7) help to prevent or heal leaky gut. They’e good friends to have. (Source: Gut and Psychology Syndrome by Natasha Campbell-Mcbride).
  • Vitamins: Another piece of fermentation magic is that it increases both the amount and bioavailability of nutrients. Sauerkraut is exceptionally high in Vitamins C, B and K, has a substantial amount of calcium and magnesium, and contains both antioxidant and detoxifying compounds. It is definitely a superfood.

Buying vs. Making Your Own

  • Bubbies is the most popular brand of “raw” sauerkraut sold in health food stores. In my town, it costs $6 for a 25 oz. jar. The cost per ounce is 24 cents, and since the sauerkraut is loosely packed, a good portion of each ounce is liquid.
  • The average price of cabbage is 70 cents/pound. The recipe below calls for 5 pounds, which is a total of $3.50. This is enough cabbage to fill a 65 oz. jar. The cost per ounce is just 5 cents, and the sauerkraut is tightly packed, giving you much more sauerkraut per ounce as well. (Cabbage is a member of the Clean 15, so you don’t need to splurge on organic.)
  • In addition, Bubbies is partially pasteurized & fermented only a short period of time. Both of these steps reduce its probiotic benefit. This recipe for homemade sauerkraut is truly raw, long fermented and full of probiotic goodness.

No-Fail No-Pound Sauerkraut Recipe

photo of top of Fido jar

Fido Jars & Other Tricks of the Trade

When it comes to fermenting foods at home, I look for easy and foolproof options. Sauerkraut doesn’t usually fall within that definition. Many friends have tried and failed to make this superfood over the years, either battling mold, funky smells or strange tastes. Honestly, their failures scared me a way, so I bought my sauerkraut, and that gets expensive. Then I read two articles that changed my perspective: Lea of Nourishing Treasures wrote about a special jar that provides the perfect fermentation vessel. It keeps the bad stuff out and the good stuff in, all with no need to weigh down the cabbage. End result: tasty, probiotic-rich, sauerkraut every time. Kim of Nourishing Gourmet wrote about a no-pound method, where there’s no need to spend fifteen minutes beating up your cabbage before putting it in the jar. Put those two tips together, and you have my kind of recipe!

Ingredients

5 pounds of cabbage
3 Tbsp. sea salt

Equipment

68 ounce Fido Jar
Knife and cutting board
Food processor (optional)

Directions

  1. Wash your hands and be sure all of your equipment is clean.
  2. Cut cabbage in half and remove the cores. If the outer leaves are wilted, throw them away. Cut the remaining cabbage into large chunks and feed into your food processor, using the largest grater attachment to shred the cabbage. If you don’t have a food processor, chop the cabbage finely with a knife.
  3. Transfer the shredded/chopped cabbage to a large bowl. Sprinkle with 3 Tbsp. salt and use two spoons to toss until the salt evenly coats the cabbage.
  4. Transfer the cabbage to your Fido jar. It won’t all fit at first. That’s OK – leave the extra in the bowl, and it will get added later.
  5. Cover both the jar and bowl with clean dry cloths, and let the cabbage “sweat” for 30 minutes.
  6. Once the 30 minutes have passed, use a large spoon or meat pounder to gently push down on the cabbage in the jar. It will compress and release its natural juices, freeing up more room in the jar. Add the remaining cabbage from the bowl and set the timer for another 30 minutes.
  7. Compress the cabbage again. Its natural juices should rise up above the shredded cabbage itself. If it doesn’t, you can add a little water as needed. Leave two inches of airspace at the top of the jar.
  8. As long as you’re using a Fido jar, no weight is needed. Simply clamp the jar shut. (For an explanation, click here.) The first week of fermentation is the gaseous stage, and the cabbage will expand upward. If your jar is very full, stick a plate under it. Sometimes a little liquid will seep out under the rubber gasket. This isn’t a problem. The beauty of the Fido jar is that it lets excess fermentation gases out without letting oxygen in. (Oxygen causes mold.)
  9. Put a piece of tape on the jar with today’s date, and set it out of sunlight, but someplace you won’t forget about it. Let it ferment for 30 days. Don’t open the jar during fermentation. If your house runs hot, check it in 3 weeks. If your house runs cold, let it ferment 5 weeks. The best flavor and nutrient content develops between 60-75 degrees. Don’t try to ferment in temperatures above 80 degrees, or the wrong type of bacteria takes over.
  10. Transfer the kraut into smaller containers and refrigerate. I eat mine in a month, but it should keep in the fridge for at least 6 months.

Notes

  • If you’ve only eaten storebought sauerkraut before, or have done shorter ferments at home, start slowly when eating this version. It has a much higher probiotic count and can cause a die-off reaction if you eat too much too fast. Start with just a teaspoon, and work your way up to 1-2 Tbsp. per meal. Fermented foods are meant to be condiments, not major food groups. A little bit goes a long way.
  • Many internet recipes for homemade sauerkraut use a short fermentation time of 3-7 days, but the fermentation process has hardly begun at that point. There are three stages of lacto-fermentation. This website shows that it takes a minimum of 20 days for all 3 stages to be reached. Traditional sauerkraut recipes have the fermentation time at 3-5 weeks, depending on room temperature.
  • If you don’t have a Fido jar, you can still use this no-pound method in your preferred fermentation vessels. However, you will have to use a weight, and it’s no longer a no-fail method. Lea of Nourishing Treasures tested 18 different fermentation vessels. Click the link to see which other ones she recommends. (Lea rocks!)

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~~~
This post is linked to the following blog carnivals:
Paleo AIP Recipe Roundtable, Fresh Bites Friday, Allergy Friendly Lunchbox, Whole Foods Friday, What I Am Eating, Sunday School, Natural Living Monday, Make Your Own Monday, Fat Tuesday, Healthy Tuesday, Family Table Tuesday, Traditional Tuesday, Tuned In Tuesday, Well Fed Wednesday, Waste Not Want Not Wednesday, Allergy-Free Wednesday, Wildcrafting Wednesday, Real Food Wednesday, Party Wave Wednesday, Whole Foods Wednesday, Thank Your Body Thursday, Tasty Traditions, Gluten Free Wednesday, Simple Lives Thursday, Paleo Rodeo, Wheat Free Wednesday, Pennywise Platter, Wellness Wednesday, Raw Foods Thursday, Fresh Foods Wednesday,

85 thoughts on “No-Fail No-Pound Sauerkraut

  1. Your writing is so easy to understand, it makes me think I might actually be able to do this! :-) I didn’t realize sauerkraut was such a rich food. With this in your diet, do you eat other pro biotic foods/supplements, or is sauerkraut all the probiotics you need?

    • Most people recommend a variety of fermented foods. I make kombucha also, and I’ve made kefir in the past. Each has a unique profile, so variety is good. When it comes to sheer numbers of probiotics (and digestive enzymes), this sauerkraut can’t be beat.

    • Traditional foods really are amazing. We’ve lost that knowledge with our modern ways, but we’re getting it back!

  2. Thank you for posting your method of making sauerkraut. I’m going to order a couple of those jars and make it as soon as my cabbage in the garden is ready. I’ve had success using a crock before, but I’ve had failures, too. Love the no-fail perspective.

    • Thanks, Judee! I love it when something intimidating (to me anyway) turns out to have an easy method. Let me know how yours turns out!

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  4. I have a question. After the fermentation is done, Do you leave the sauerkraut in the same Fido jar ? or Do you transfer it to another non airtight jar like a mason jar

      • I am brand new to fermenting, so sorry if this is obvious. After the fermenting period, do you just put the jar in the refrigerator? And then how long is it good for?

        • I put mine in the fridge, but Lea from Nourishing Treasures leaves hers on the counter. The beauty of fermentation is that it preserves food for a very long time. Count on a few months at least, though I think it will keep much longer than that. I’ve read that after a few months, the flavor and texture changes, but that it doesn’t go “bad”.

  5. I have cabbage planted in my garden and I’m looking forward to making my own sauerkraut this year! Thank you for sharing this on Wildcrafting Wednesday! Hope to see you again.

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  7. I found you on Pennywise Platter Thursdays!

    Just gotta say…Love it! I will have to try it this way next time. I’ve got some purple cabbage waiting to be made into sauerkraut :)

  8. Hi, I you make this in the Fido jar, when it is ready to eat, do you just take out what you want and keep the rest in the refrigerator? When it is ready to eat, can you freeze it, or do you have to water bath process?

    Thank you

    • Hi Cathy. It will keep a very long time in the refrigerator – at least 6 months, and some people say indefinitely. You can leave it in the Fido jar, or transfer it into smaller jars. Either way, the fermentation process preserves it. There is no need to freeze it or do a water bath. How’s that for easy?

    • That’s just a few degrees above the ideal range. As long as you don’t go above 80 degrees, it should be fine. Just check it sooner – it will probably be ready in 2 – 3 weeks.

  9. I just bought some big fido jars in order to start doing some ferments! I tried some last year and they didn’t turn out, so I’m excited to do this. PERFECT timing for this post. Thanks so much for linking it up on Wellness Wednesday!

  10. I was excited to find this recipe! I bought a Fido jar and followed the steps you outlined. My ‘kraut is at Day 7 right now. One thing that I’m a little unsure of: my cabbage has all risen to the top of the Fido jar, and there is about 1 inch of liquid at the bottom of the jar. I assume it’s okay that the cabbage is floating like this? Is this normal? There definitely is still some liquid in and around the cabbage itself.

    Thanks!

    • Yes, that’s fine. The first few days of fermenting are a gaseous stage, and this moves the cabbage upward. That’s why weights are used with other jars. The Fido lets the gas out without letting oxygen in (so no need for the weight). As long as you keep it closed (no opening the jar to check on the kraut) it should stay safe and sealed during the full month’s ferment.

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  12. Hello again, So I am ready to make my Kraut. Unfortunately I can’t afford to get fido jars at this time, so will the regular mason jar work with the ring and seal? If so, do you heat the seals? Or just put them on and tighten? Do you tighten then tight? Also, if you need to add water, do you use hot water or cold water? Every jar I made last year was just not good, I have a large crock, I would love to try this method too, but don’t know where to begin with it either. Thank you for all your help.

    • Hi Cathy. One thing that’s helpful to realize is that fermentation is nothing like canning. There is no need for water baths or vacuum seals or any heat at all. The fermentation process itself preserves your food. That said, I’ve never done the mason jar method, so I can’t say that’s no-fail. The main difference is that you’ll have to use a weight, to be sure the cabbage stays below the brine the whole time. Otherwise it will mold. Lea from Nourishing Treasures is a sauerkraut expert and she has a free video course you can watch: http://www.nourishingtreasures.com/index.php/2012/07/11/sauerkraut-101-its-already-here/

  13. My sauerkraut turned out GREAT! I added some garlic and dill, and it’s deeeeeeeee-lish. I’m thinking next time I’ll add some ginger. Thank you so much Eileen!

  14. I’ve tried to make sauerkraut three times now and the sauerkraut releases plenty of juice initially. Then it seems to soak it back up and becomes completely dry. Any idea what is causing this? I’m lost and I’ve followed Dr. Natasha’s recipe to a T each time.

    • Hi Mike. It’s normal for there to be no visible liquid, but the kraut should still be moist. Store-bought sauerkraut is sold with water added, which is why it seems juicier. You can add water to your finished kraut at home. I do, because like you, I like the extra moisture. So after 30 days, when my sauerkraut’s ready, I add some filtered water to it, and give it a shake to distribute the moisture. You can add as much water as you like. It shouldn’t harm the sauerkraut at all. However, if you mean the sauerkraut is dried out like it’s been sitting in the sun, I don’t know why that would happen, but I would imagine it’s a problem with your jar or crock. In that case, I recommend trying a Fido jar instead.

  15. Thanks for the advice…I think the problem is two fold. First off doctor Natasha says that it will be ready in a week. I found a post online that says the only time it will be ready in a week is if the surrounding air temperature is around 80 degrees. I keep my house around 71 so that could be why. Do you think if I add a little water and stick it in the garage it will do its thing or do you suggest starting over since the top was exposed to air for a few days?

    • If it was exposed to air, I would start over. A lot of modern recipes for sauerkraut use short fermentation times of 3-7 days, but that’s really too short to develop any beneficial bacteria at almost any temperature. The links in the Notes section of the article above show that. I suggest leaving Natasha’s recipe behind and follow this one instead. Sauerkraut tastes best AND has the best blend of probiotics when fermented at lower temperatures for a longer period of time. So 71 degrees is perfect, and give it 3 to 4 weeks fermentation with your new batch.

  16. Sauerkraut is not something I ever learned to like, despite my German heritage. I know it’s good for you, though. Maybe I need to try it again. Thanks for sharing this at Raw Foods Thursdays!

    • Expanding our tastes can be challenging sometimes, can’t it? You can add flavors, though, and that might help! Kirsten in the comments above mentioned that she added garlic and dill to her first batch, and ginger to her second batch.

  17. I’m looking forward to trying this! I’ve been so scared to make a fermented food myself, but you’ve taken the scary out of it. Thank you!

    • Let me know how it goes. Sauerkraut in particular scared me until I stumbled upon these tips. Now, it’s so easy, I keep a batch going all the time.

  18. Hello, thank you!!

    My first batch is ready but the brine seems to have evaporated from the top quarter of the jar. Is the dry stuff ok to eat? what can I do to prevent this happening in the future?

    fermented regards,

    Noam

    • The brine hasn’t evaporated; instead your cabbage has expanded during the fermentation to rise above the brine. As long as you used a Fido Jar, it’s totally normal and safe to eat.

      P.S. Although a weight isn’t necessary with a fido jar (which is why I like them), you can certainly use one if you want to keep all of your kraut below the brine. Just make sure you can still close your jar with the airtight seal.

    • Hinder. Vinegar is only used when you want to pickle something, which is a different process that doesn’t contain the benefits of fermentation. Also, since ACV is a living food, you would be introducing different strains of bacteria that would compete with the ones that develop naturally during sauerkraut fermentation.

  19. I have been testing out my Harsch fermenting pot. The first batch went for 4 weeks and wasn’t that sour tasting and there was a little mold on top. I want to avoid all mold and that is why I bought the Harsch. I made sure this last time there was more salt water and the kraut was submerged and no mold this time around. I went 9 weeks and this batch is much better. Not quite as sour tasting as Bubbies which is what I am shooting for. I do think the bacteria count is great with mine than with Bubbies. I just think they have a better sour tasting kraut I want to replicate. Are you saying that you can achieve a Bubbies sourness and crunchiness in 4 weeks with a Fido jar in 70 degree temperatures? I read elsewhere that it takes at least 10 to 12 weeks of fermenting to achieve this with cabbage. But I have heard that Bubbies only ferments for about 2 weeks. I wonder if they spike the process by just keeping the liquid and putting new cabbage in and this way and this accelerates the process. If that is so then maybe using the liquid from a jar of Bubbies as a starter (much like bakers use starters) would shorten the fermenting process. I think using a Fido jar would be much easier to work with since my 10 liter Harsch is extremely heavy and very expensive. I could have many jars going at once with the Fidos.

    • My kraut gets very sour and is still crunchy at the 4-week mark in the Fido. I like it better than Bubbies, actually. If you want the specific Bubbies flavor, I think using some of their liquid as a starter is a great idea. I’ve heard of other people doing that, and they say it works like a charm.

      • Well I wanted to follow up on this now that I just tried my first batch of kraut from one of my fido jars. It works really well. Yes it has a good tartness to it like Bubbies does. Not the same but very good. Much better than my expensive Harsch pot! So much quicker too! I need to sell that thing on Craigs List to recoup the expense. I plan to have four fidos one for each week of the month going. I used the 15 grams of sea salt to 2lbs of cabbage and then added 8 cups of filtered water with 6 T. of sea salt to the 5lbs of cabbage I fit into my 5 liter fido jar. I do think getting the right ratio of salt is key to this as well.

          • Eileen have you ever used the juice from one kraut batch and used it as a starter for a new batch of kraut? Did it speed up the process or taste different? I know that it is best to use organic cabbage but sometimes I can’t find it. Have you or anyone noticed that using GMO and non organic cabbage resulted in in bad kraut? Has anyone actually ran tests on such kraut and what have they found under the microscope? Has anyone ran tests on what strains are found in organic and non GMO kraut and in what quantities? Any research to cite? I have to say I am so glad I found your site and the information here it has been invaluable! I am trying to sell my Harsch now and no one is interested : (

          • That’s a lot of questions! I’ll answer what I can. I have never used juice from a prior batch as a starter. It’s not necessary. Cabbage is actually one of the Clean 15 (crops with very low pesticide use), so I think it’s fine to use conventional for sauerkraut. I’ve used both organic and conventional cabbage, and I can’t tell the difference. They both seem to ferment equally well. If you’re concerned with GMO, just look at the produce number. If it starts with an “8″ it’s GMO. If it starts with a “9″ it’s not. As for the other questions, I don’t know. Give the Harsch time; someone will snap it up!

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  22. I am new to fermenting, I am using mason jars with lids that have a built in vapor lock. My kraut bubbled over and left some of the cabbage without liquid for a little less than a week. Do I need to throw out the whole batch or can I scrape off the top layer that was without liquid?

  23. What is your thoughts on rinsing the sauerkraut before eating to get rid of some of the sodium if you’re on a low sodium diet but still want the probiotic benefits that eating fermented sauerkraut gives you? Appreciate the recipe you shared!

    Thank You, Dona

    • Hi Dona. Rinsing it wlll remove some of the probiotics, but not all of them. It sounds like a good compromise for your needs, though.

  24. I’ve made some brilliant kraut thanks to you over the winter but now summer is upon us! The temperature can easily hover around 95 and smash through 100 on hot days. What are the implications for A) my batch that has already done it’s month and is now happily sitting on the counter dispensing into a smaller container as required. (fridge is the obvious solution but would rather keep it out) and B) any batches that I want to brew over summer.

    Much love thanks and good bacteria,

    Noam

    • Hi Noam. Does it get that hot in your house, or is that the outside temperature? Generally speaking, any temp over 80 degrees makes the kraut soft, with poor flavor, and low diversity of probiotics, so it’s not recommended. Is there a cool place, like a basement or a garage you can use to ferment in the summer? If not, it might be best to just make this a winter activity.

  25. Just finished my first batch last week…. this worked SO WELL!! THANK YOU … it tastes so great (I added lemon rind and rosemary like my favorite store- bought version). I’m wondering if this method will work with carrots and beets too??

  26. I packed two jars on Saturday. Today is Thursday. So about 5 days later and I am not seeing any bubbling. Should I? Does that mean I did it wrong? The cabbage is losing its green color, and I don’t see any browning, mold or other things. I just expected it would bubble since other websites have said this should happen. I forgot to weigh the cabbage at the store, so I had to guess how much was 5 pounds. So my salt to cabbage ratio might be off. Would that be a problem?

    • You don’t always see the bubbling, Julie. Don’t worry – fermentation is happening! The hardest thing to do the first time you ferment is to just trust the process.

  27. I have noticed in my first two batches of kraut in my 5 liter fido jars that towards the bottom the juice is pretty salty. Wanted to know if maybe I am using too much salt. I use 7.5 grams of sea salt to each lb of cabbage. I then added 8 cups of filtered or boiled and cooled water with 6 T. of sea salt to the 5lbs of cabbage that fits into a 5 liter fido jar. Is this the ratio you use? My husband and I both prefer the taste our new kraut with the fidos over Bubbies!

    • I use the recipe in the article above, which only calls for 3Tbsp. sea salt for 5 lbs of cabbage, packed down into a 68 oz. jar. I don’t add any water. To adapt the recipe to a 5 liter jar, you would need around 12 lbs. cabbage and 7.5 Tbsp. salt.

  28. I’m going to try and make a batch in summer and keep it cool. But there will be a few days above 80, but I’ll try to keep it in a cool place in the house. What signs should I look for to recognize bad bacteria?

    • As long as it will be under 80 degrees most days, it should be fine. You’ll just want to shorten the fermentation time to 2 weeks. As for signs of poor bacteria balance, pay attention to flavor and texture. At high temps, sauerkraut often gets soft and doesn’t taste as good.

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  31. Hi! I drink the juice and don’t eat the cabbage. Does anybody know if instead of cutting up more cabbage and making a whole new batch of sauerkraut, can you just refill with new water to make more sauerkraut juice?

  32. Eileen,

    You are just “da bomb”! I loved the sauerkraut the first time around and it was so easy. I’ve fallen off the wagon, though, but am trying to be resolved to incorporate these important foods (and drink) into our diets. Thanks again for this great recipe. I love feeling confident that I’m not introducing pathogens!! XO – Jen

  33. Me again – I have a question. I got nervous about my Fido jar (I overfilled it) – so I “burped” it (juice everywhere). I quickly locked it down, but now notice that I have a couple of darker spots in the kraut here and there. I think I’m paranoid about mold. Do you think I should start over with a new batch? Also, is it a problem if there are a few air bubbles throughout the jar? I thought I pushed everything down well enough to get rid of any air pockets, but I see a few tiny spots and wondered if this could be a problem. Thanks for the help!
    XO
    Jen

    • Oh my. I made the same mistake. What a mess! We both need to learn to trust the Fido! Sadly, burping the jar lets oxygen in, and oxygen feeds the bad bacteria. I learned this through experience by letting mine ferment for the month (after burping) and then tasting it. It didn’t look moldy, but it tasted awful! I recommend starting with a new batch, and never burping the jar again.

      • Sigh – I’m glad I asked. I read an article on the dangers of the Fido and it started freaking me out…I should have stuck with the plan. I had a great experience the last time. The kraut was easy, no problems, and it tasted great.

        Thanks for getting back with me so quickly!
        XO
        Jen

  34. I’ve eaten sauerkraut sold in a heavy platic bag.

    I rinse it to remove the salt.

    Does rinsing it make it less probiotic/less healthy??

    • When you buy sauerkraut, make sure it’s sold in the refrigerated section and specifically labeled “raw”. That way, you know it still contains probiotics. (Most sauerkraut sold in stores has been pasteurized.) As for your question, unfortunately rinsing does remove some of the probiotics – not all of them, though.

  35. I just opened my sauerkraut. Went for 5 weeks at about 68 degrees F. Everything looks good and like your final picture, but I was wondering what it should taste like. It is still crunchy and definitely still tastes like cabbage with a salty and slightly tangy brine. Is this correct? I’m used to the grocery store kind that has been processed. Thanks.

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