Paleo Autoimmune Protocol FAQ

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“I’m not telling you it’s going to be easy.
I’m telling you it’s going to be worth it.”
~ Art Williams

Frequently Asked Questions

What can I eat?

How long do I have to stay on the protocol? The protocol was originally designed as an elimination diet to determine if you have food intolerances. You restrict the foods for 30 days, and then reintroduce them one at a time to see if you have a negative reaction. That is enough time for the foods to have cleared your system, so your body can give clear signals during the reintroduction phase. It’s now recommended that you wait until you see clear improvement in your autoimmune symptoms. For some, that will be 30 days. Others may wait a few months, or up to one year. That shows that healing is taking place. While on the AIP, make sure you eat as wide a variety of foods within the protocol as possible, and focus on nutrient-density.

Why can’t I just do an allergy test? The autoimmune protocol addresses food intolerances, which are different from allergies. Food allergies are life threatening, often sending people to the hospital in anaphylactic shock. Intolerances, on the other hand, ramp up inflammation in the body over time, exacerbating the symptoms of autoimmune disease. Unfortunately, there is no scientifically proven lab test for food intolerances. (Although there are tests sold under the names IgG, Alcat, Enterolab, EAV and Muscle Testing, these tests often give both false positives and false negatives.) For that reason, the elimination diet is the gold standard for discovering food intolerances. It takes effort, but it’s your only guarantee of accurate results.

Why is the reaction to a food stronger after the elimination diet? When you eat a food regularly, to which you are intolerant, your body goes into a chronic state of inflammation in response. Symptoms vary from person to person. It might be digestive distress or joint pain or mood swings. For people with autoimmune disease, it exaggerates the symptoms of your disease. When you eliminate this food for 30 days or more, two things happen: (1) You start to feel better, and (2) your body has a chance to calm down its defenses. Then, when you reintroduce the food, the response can be acute. Although it feels bad, this is actually a good thing, because you have a clear communication that this food harms your body. As long as you stop eating the food, the acute response goes away, and you return to feeling better than ever before.

I have autoimmune disease and am just now learning about the paleo diet. Should I start right away with the autoimmune protocol, or begin with the full paleo diet (without the added AIP restrictions)? Begin with full paleo for 3-6 months. This will be a big change already, and some people are lucky enough to go into remission with no further restrictions needed. If, after 3-6 months, you haven’t seen the results you want, then transition to the autoimmune protocol.

Should I go off my medications when I start the AIP? No. Dietary healing is a slow process. You are rebuilding your body on a cellular level, and that doesn’t happen overnight. If you go off your medication, you will likely flare before healing has a chance to take place. Instead, wait until your symptoms improve and stabilize, and then work with your doctor to safely reduce your medications, one at a time. Everyone is unique: some people will be able to eliminate their need for medication altogether; others will find that a combination of medication plus diet works best. Don’t compare your journey to anyone else. Pay attention to how you feel and let that guide your decisions.

I developed constipation after starting the AI Protocol. Why would this happen? When you make a big change to your diet, constipation is a common temporary side effect. As your body adjusts to the new diet, this should clear on its own. During the transition, some things that can help are: (1) be sure you’re eating enough fruits and vegetables, (2) be sure you’re drinking enough water, (3) prune juice, (4) magnesium citrate, (5) probiotics/fermented foods, (6) digestive tonics, (7) abdominal massage, (8) squatty potty (you don’t have to buy one; you can often substitute a small stool at home), (9) enemas.

I’m already thin and can’t afford to lose any more weight. How can I make sure I’ll maintain my weight on the AIP?

  • Some autoimmune diseases result in unwanted weight loss due to digestive difficulties. The AIP is a nutrient-dense diet that helps heal the digestive system, so it’s actually a good choice in this situation. That said, some people accidentally eat low-calorie on the AIP. Here are some ways to make sure you eat enough:
  • Here’s a great article from A Clean Plate. She guides you through the process of tracking your daily food and seeing how you measure up in terms of calorie and nutrition goals. She also demonstrates how to revamp a meal plan to one that supports healing.
  • Coconut is high calorie, nutrient dense and full of healthy fats. Add a cup of coconut milk to your diet daily. You can add it to a smoothie, use it in cooking or drink it straight-up.
  • If you can afford it, eat an avocado a day. They are also nutrient-dense and full of beneficial fats.
  • Be generous with your use of healthy fats both in cooking and in dressing your salads.
  • Drink one glass of fresh-pressed vegetable and fruit juice daily. This is easily absorbed nutrition by your body and also an easy way to add calories. The general recipe is 1/2 vegetables and 1/2 fruit, to be both nutritious and palatable. The more variety you bring to your daily juices, the better the nutrition. However, juicing is most therapeutic in moderation, so stay with 1 cup daily.
  • Here’s a great recipe for a weight gain shake from SCD Lifestyle, providing 1200 calories in one drink: 1 avocado, 1 cup of coconut milk, 2 medium bananas, and 1 cup cooked sweet potato.

What can I do to help myself succeed on the AIP?

  • Plan ahead. Look at your daily eating habits and think of what foods won’t be allowed on the autoimmune protocol. Plan your substitutes in advance. What will you eat for breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks?
  • Keep a journal of your autoimmune symptoms for 2-4 weeks before beginning the autoimmune protocol. This will be your baseline. Continue the journal during the AIP. You’ll be looking for positive changes once foods are eliminated and testing for reactions when foods are reintroduced.
  • Enlist the support of your family and friends.
  • Get support from the global community: Like my Facebook page for daily inspiration. Join this AIP Recipe Group for more great meal ideas. Join this AIP Support Group for support on any question or concern your have during your AIP journey.
  • If at all possible, remove tempting food from the house, and fill your cabinets, fridge and freezer with AIP approved foods instead.
  • Avoid restaurants during this time, if you can. Restaurant food always contains hidden ingredients over which you have no control. If you find you have to eat out, follow the tips listed in this article.
  • If possible, postpone changes to your medications/supplements/treatments until your AIP experiment is complete. Changes to your medical protocol can skew the results of your food tests. If you need to make a change, postpone food reintroduction until your response to your new treatment stabilizes.
  • Be patient. The elimination period is a minimum of 30 days, and the reintroduction period takes at least a few months. Be prepared for that.
  • Open yourself up to new meal habits. For example, in our culture, we think breakfast has to be either grain or egg-based, but much of the world starts their day with soup, salad or leftovers. I love soup for breakfast. Mickey at Autoimmune Paleo usually starts the day with a meat and veggie plate. The Paleo Mom shares some more great breakfast ideas in this post. You can find more AIP breakfast ideas here.
  • If you want some extra guidance making the leap to AIP, Alt-Ternative Autoimmune offers an online group class, transitioning people over a 6 week period.
  • Don’t binge. Sometimes, when people are allowed only a limited number of foods, they’ll binge on what they can eat (a whole box of clementines, a whole batch of homemade crackers), but binging is always hard on the digestion, no matter what the food, and the result will be a flare in your autoimmune symptoms. Instead, eat balanced meals and moderate snacks. Eat plenty; eat variety; just don’t binge.
  • Take care of yourself mentally and emotionally during this time as well. This type of restricted diet can be a stressful experience. Carve out “time for you” each day, even if it’s only 15 minutes to relax. Meditate, take a bath, take a walk, listen to some favorite music, have a good cry, have a good laugh, whatever you need.
  • Believe in yourself, and know that the AIP can be a powerful tool in your healing process.

If I fall of the AIP wagon, do I have to start over on day 1?

Unfortunately, yes. The science of an elimination diet is that you need to avoid the foods for a minimum of 30 consecutive days. This is the only way your body can communicate tolerance/intolerance clearly during reintroductions. This doesn’t mean you have to be perfect. Many people take a few tries before getting solidly on the protocol. Do the best you can, and eventually you’ll get there.

Have I missed a question? Just ask through the comment section below, and I’ll do my best to answer.

AIP Series

I’ve written a series of articles to guide you through the autoimmune protocol, step by step. It includes my experience with the AIP, mistakes to avoid, book reviews, and more. Click here to see the whole list.

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This post is linked to the following blog carnivals:
Whole Food Friday, Fight Back Friday, Sunday School, Natural Living Monday, Fat Tuesday, Healthy Tuesday, Tuned In Tuesday, Traditional Tuesday, Well Fed Wednesday, Allergy Free Wednesday, Waste Not Want Not Wednesday, Gluten Free Wednesday, Whole Foods Wednesday, Wildcrafting Wednesday, Real Food Wednesday, Party Wave Wednesday, Tasty Traditions, Simple Lives Thursday, Paleo Rodeo,

42 thoughts on “Paleo Autoimmune Protocol FAQ

  1. Pingback: Paleo Autoimmune Protocol FAQ | Paleo Digest

  2. Nowhere is it written in stone that we have to have cereal or eggs for breakfast–nobody’s going to arrest us for eating “dinner” foods for breakfast! I regularly eat lamb chops, or occasional salmon salad out of a bowl. Whatever’s in the fridge, I eat, and if there’s no cereal or eggs, or other inappropriate food (which there never is these days), I don’t eat it.

    • It’s funny – our expectations built on habits often feel like the way things should always be. That’s why change is hard, but then once you make the change, the world becomes a bigger place. I can’t imagine going back to my old breakfasts. They were so unsatisfying!

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  5. thank you so much for posting all of this amazing info. I have Hashimoto’s (just recently diagnosed after 3+ years of agony and no answers from doctors). I am excited to start the immune protocol as I will do whatever it takes to feel better! However, I read on another blog (PaleoMom) that for some the protocol can take up to 3 years!? Is it true that some would need to stay on it for that long? It seems like 30 days vs 3 years is a huge difference.

    • It’s common to need to stay on your personalized version of the protocol for up to three years, but you don’t need to stay on the full autoimmune protocol that long. Do 30-60 days elimination period. Then test out the reintroductions (this can take many months to complete). After that time, you’ll know what foods your body can’t tolerate, and which ones are fine for you. This varies from person to person. For example, one person might do fine with eggs, while another might do fine with nuts. The protocol is a means to discovering what your body needs. Then, when you know that, make that your diet longterm. Every 6 months, you can try to reintroduce foods again. As you heal, you’ll be able to eat more of them. But overall, healing takes time. Some people get into remission quickly. For others, it can take years. But don’t be discouraged, because within that time frame, improvements happen, and I can say from experience that you’ll celebrate each way you begin to feel better. Does that make sense?

      • Yes that makes sense. So does this also mean that once we are more healed down the line and our antibodies are lower that we may be able to eat more of the foods on the elimination list? (eggs, nuts, dairy,etc) that we were not able to tolerate in the early faces of the elimination? And that gluten, soy, etc we must always avoid?

        I ask this because I did Paleo for about a year and felt a little better but not 100%. (this was before my diagnosis, I did this on my own) My family thought my diet was too strict so I began eating grains, gluten and dairy again. I felt fine at first, my autoimmune symptoms did not kick in until the 4th month or so, and then it got really bad. I know clearly that I have to avoid these but its interesting it took so long for my symptoms to get bad. I regret even stopping Paleo because of how I feel now and it made me gain 35lbs in 5 months! Hoping the weight will come off naturally as my body readjusts and heals!

        • That’s the goal! For example the Paleo Mom originally had such a high intolerance to egg whites that she actually rinsed her egg yolks before using them. Now, after having been on the protocol for a year, she can have whole eggs occasionally. Mickey from Auto-immune Paleo stayed on the full protocol longer – I’m thinking like 6 months. Now she can have nuts and eggs in moderation. Stacy from Paleo Parents reacted very strongly to dairy originally, but now she can have butter. I don’t know anyone who has successfully reintroduced nightshades – that seems to be a long shot. As for the rest of Paleo, it’s considered a lifestyle, so most people have no intention of reintroducing grains/legumes/soy again. I came to my healing diet from GAPS first, and that is designed to be temporary, meaning that in about 3 years you can start reintroducing sprouted grains and legumes back into the diet. However, the Standard American Diet is never recommended again. So, time will tell!

          Do you know about the Hashimotos 411 Facebook group? There are 6,000 members, and they’re experts on dietary healing of Hashimotos. There’s more to it than just the foods you don’t eat. You need to add in healing foods like bone broths and organ meats. You need to work on reducing stress, improving sleep, etc. Many Hashis people continue to take thyroid medication and that combined with the paleo autoimmune protocol allows them to feel their best. Detox plays a role in all autoimmune diseases, but especially Hashimotos. If you haven’t read my interview with Carrie (who put her Hashimotos into complete remission), I recommend it, because things like saunas and castor oil packs were essential to her healing.

  6. I have Fibromyalgia. I quit gluten 2 years ago and do fell better as far as my digestive system and my acne is gone. I also try to stay grain free. In your opinion do you think doing the AIP would or could be beneficial? I’m planning on starting the Whole30 in September to see if that helps. So I’m just curious if any one with fibromyalgia can be helped? Thanks!

    • I think it would be worth trying. It’s basically a method of communicating with your body, to learn what foods it does and doesn’t like. If you don’t want to jump into the full autoimmune protocol yet, I recommend giving up nightshades for 30 days. If you look at the symptoms of nightshade intolerance, you’ll see a lot of fibromyalgia symptoms on the list. Here’s a link to my Nightshade-Free Survival Guide.

  7. Thank you so much Eileen! How nice to wake up to your quick reply/answer! I will be checking out the info you recommended!
    Colleen

  8. Which is the quantity of carbohydrates, and the good ones, that we need to mantain the thyroide healthy and avoid high insuline. I have hashimoto and insuline resistance. Sorry for my english

    • Hi Lucia. Everyone’s needs are different, so I can’t give you a number on this. The best thing to do is try different levels and see how you personally feel. The best carb sources are vegetables, especially the safe starches: sweet potatoes, turnips, beets, carrots, winter squash, etc.

  9. Hi Eileen. I have been suffering from Hashimotos for the past 4 years and Rhematoid arthritis for a year now. Unfortunately I am on methotrexate…at the time of diagnosis I literally could not get out of , and had tried all the dietary healing that I knew of at that time. I have been gearing up to do GAPS intro, and just came across this AiP. Would you suggest starting with GAPS, as you did, for that initial gut healing? (I know I have leaky guy and candida). Or would you start with AIP? Does AIP heal the leaky gut as well? I’ve been gluten free for 3 years, grain free and yeast free for 2. I tested positive for allergies to about 25 different foods, yeasts, and ferments, and eggs among them. (so no fermented foods for now?) I already consume bone broths, and do mostly pastured/grass fed and/or organic meats. Mostly all organic fruit and veggies,and I drink fresh veggie ginger lemon juice every other day. I do have a weakness for seed butters and raw cream in my coffee, so I know those will have to go. Thanks in advance for any advice!!

    • Hi Lisa. The GAPS Introduction diet can be very healing. The problem is that it introduces foods that are common food intolerances (like eggs, nuts and dairy) rather quickly. If people are intolerant of those foods, they get stuck on Stage 2 (which gets really boring after a while.) A leaky gut can’t heal if it’s getting irritated by food intolerances. This is where the AIP is very helpful. It’s a self-experiment, where you learn which foods your body does & doesn’t like. After completing the AIP, you could do a modified version of the GAPS Introduction Diet, based on your own body’s needs as a finishing touch. that would be my recommendation anyway. If you want to see my results as an example, read this post of my AIP experience.

  10. Eileen:
    Thank you so much for this amazing information. I have Hashimoto’s, Lichen Sclerosis, and major allergies (everything outdoors but a pine tree and animals). I have been diagnosed with cross allergies based on my extreme outdoor allergies making me intolerant to many fruits and veggies. We actually did scratch tests with fresh foods that I typically eat and was able to see what intolerance’s I have. Most of them are on the nightshades list. I am treating these disorders with different specialists, but not getting the relief with traditional medicine that I would like to see. I think a diet change thanks to all of my autoimmune issues might be the next necessary step. How would you recommend starting? I am currently eating the average American diet. Is it best to start regular Palio or start the Autoimmune from day 1. I have even had suggestions from friends to start with going Gluten-Free and Dairy Free to begin with. (My 18 month old has to go Dairy Free thanks to GI issues he is already developed.) To be honest, I have a Cherry Coke addiction and that is my one true love in life. I plan to start as soon as my last Cherry Coke is gone. :( I don’t want to give that up, but don’t really have much of a choice. Where would you suggest I start??? Please help!!!

    • It depends on your personality. Some people find change easiest in stages. Others need to dive in 100%. I also had to switch from a Standard American Diet (and I had a diet coke addiction, so I empathize). I tried gluten-free/processed food-free first, but saw no improvement. So, very quickly, I went to full Paleo and started improving. I stuck with that until I plateaued in my progress (about 6 months later). That’s when I did the AIP. For me, going straight from SAD to AIP would have been too hard a transition. But follow your intuition on this one. If you decide to do the AIP now or in the future, the Autoimmune-Paleo Cookbook is really helpful, because it provides menu plans along with the recipes.

  11. Thanks so much for this post. I have just discovered this site through stumbling on the auto immune paleo protocol a few months ago .What a joy to discover people who eat like I do , who have noticed the same responses from food as I do and who are often seen as picky eaters . I was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease 9 years ago and did not like the effects the medication prescribed had on my body and mind .Over the years through trial and error I realised diet had a huge effect on my health but also realised it wasn’t just diet sometimes. I started with eliminating the usual suspects wheat dairy and eventually gluten but noticed sometimes this would not stop a flare up . I went to loads of food allergy testing and they worked on improving my health a little . Maintaining and improving my health through homeopathy acupuncture and chi Kung I finally found Paleo . It dramatically improved my energy levels . I felt like there was just one tiny thing that I needed to do so when I found the auto immune paleo diet I finally felt like I’d arrived ! It’s so good to find information on how to put on weight or at least preventing more weight loss as I struggle with this constantly . Thanks so much for all your information I no longer feel like I’m searching aimlessly alone in the quest for better health.

  12. Your blog and posts are so helpful. I became sick after a trip to Europe in July. It started with numbness in my right big toe, Panic attacks and dizziness that I link to gluten, difficulty swallowing and then acid reflux. The doctors kept telling me I had anxiety and gave me pills. I searched around for a doctor who I felt was a good match and in out first appointment she immediately suspected an auto-immune disease. My ANA panels came back positive and last night I received my test results online. I meet with my doctor Friday to go over the results but I was able to deduct the diagnosis through online searches.
    When my symptoms severely evolved about 6 weeks ago I read about GaPS but was intimidated by the meat. I went vegan and cut out all processed foods for 2 weeks. I got so sick and weak. I decided 2 weeks ago that I would implement some GaPS philosophies into my diet and I have regained some of my strength back. On Saturday I got the results of positive ANA and spent a lot of time on the AIP website which led me to further cutback my food selections (I had suspected a night shade sensitivity and fodmap sensitivity). I have now cut out nuts, seeds and eggs in addition to dairy, grains and wheat.
    I am already noticing improvements in my symptoms but I am concerned that I have made too many dietary changes in such a short time. The way my body has reacted to certain foods I know to avoid them.
    Does the AIP cookbook fully explain the elimination/introduction process?
    When I got sick I started a homeopathic protocol, is the alcohol used in homeopathic tinctures enough to cause a flair, if that alcohol is grain-based?

    Thank you for your guidance on this blog. The positive outlook and success stories are motivating. I hope to be one of those success stories.

    • Hi Celia. First of all, congratulations on taking such quick control of your health! Don’t worry about the alcohol in your homeopathy; only alcohol abuse is linked to leaky gut, not small doses. The cookbook is great because it gives you menu plans and over 100 recipes that are safe to eat, and when you’re new to AIP, that can be hard to figure out. When you’re ready for reintroductions, I recommend following the protocol I outline here on my blog. You mentioned worries about making so many dietary changes so quickly. If you’re feeling malnourished, the best thing to do is to increase the healing foods in your diet that are recommended on AIP: bone broth, organ meats, seafood, and plenty of veggies. It sounds like you’re doing great, and I fully believe you WILL be a success story.

  13. How about peas, the Green kind , not snap peas, but regular peas? Can i have them in the first phase? Thank you for sharing and giving us hope. I have ME and have noticed great imrovement when i change my diet but i have never embarked on a full AIP. … Although it is Boring to have this food over christmas i don’t want to postpone the healing.

  14. Hi

    My family has been eating “clean” for several years, mostly following a Wesron Price diet although we are not that strict about occasionally eating out or having junk once in a while. However, my 15 year old has just started a paleo AIP diet (day 5 yay!) in hopes of addressing some skin and other autoimmune issues before they get worse. My question is does it matter what order we introduce foods back? She’s hoping to get back to(raw) milk, cheeses and eggs first, (assuming no reactions to them) but I didn’t know if there is a reason to start with other foods. Thanks!

    • The important thing with reintroductions is to reintroduce one food at a time, and give yourself plenty of time to feel a reaction before reintroducing another. The order of foods within each category is more important than the order of categories. For example, she’ll want to reintroduce egg yolks by themselves, before reintroducing whole eggs. In the dairy category, she’ll want to reintroduce ghee first, then butter, then fermented raw dairy, before regular dairy. Have her read my article on Reintroductions to safely guide her through the process. Kudos to her, by the way, for doing that AIP at age 15! She’s very wise for her age.

  15. So this is day 15 of my 15 year old daughter’s paleo AIP diet. Today she had a beef, broccoli, carrot and onion stir fry (in olive oil) for lunch. She said she felt very bloated after lunch. She had the exact same stir fry yesterday for lunch and didn’t have any problem but after thinking about it, said she thinks she remembers feeling that way after dinner the other night when we also had beef. We have had beef 3- 4 times in the past week for the first time since she started the diet because she was getting tired of chicken and pork. Any thoughts? Should we stop the beef for a week and try again to see if that happens again? Oh, also she made a chicken stir fry last week and put thyme in it and got a stomachache, which she blames on the thyme as she’s not had any up to this point. We still have 15 days to go before starting to add back any foods but didn’t think these two would be an issue! Thanks!

    • It’s tempting to try to connect a food to a symptom, but reactions can take up to 72 hours, so there’s no way of knowing if the beef or thyme were the problem, or something else she ate in the prior 3 days. It could also simply be a digestive issue unrelated to a specific food. Healing takes time, and your daughter can expect intermittent symptoms as she heals. I don’t recommend removing any more foods at this point. Instead, focus on supporting digestion. Is she taking any digestive tonics or enzymes? Most people with gut issues need those. For supplements, it’s best to work with a practitioner. If you want to try homemade digestive boosts, here’s a good list (just don’t do the cayenne, since it’s a nightshade). http://www.20somethingallergies.com/healing-digestion-digestive-tonics/

  16. Thanks–I hated to cut back even more from what she was eating! She has been drinking quite a bit of kombucha and I gave her a bottle of Prescript assist probiotics to supplement but I’m not sure if she’s been taking them–I’ll ask her. She also takes apple cider vinegar for premenstrual symptoms but I see it’s on the tonic list so may get her to try that more regularly.

  17. help! I just found out that I am pregnant! great but i have been on the AIP for 50 days and have just started reintroducing foods. But now i don’t know if i should stop. It feels so restrictive since i am also avoiding fodmaps. What should i do? eat the same till i deliver? how bad would it be if i added some foods? I am eating AIP for my ME and leaky gut. so happy but lost about the food!

    • Congratulations! First let me say that I’m not a doctor, so this is advice from a friend. Many people with autoimmune disease go into remission when pregnant and are able to eat a much wider variety of foods without flaring. That was true for Angie of Alt-Ternative Autoimmune and Whitney of Nutrisclerosis. So, go ahead and expand your diet and make sure you’re eating enough for you and your little one! After delivery is when it’s more common to flare, so that would be a good time to plan on doing the AIP again, preventatively.

  18. Hello! I have almost completed three months of AIP and previously completed a two year stint on GAPS. I am attempting to heal from 27 years of alopecia (varies between areata, universalis, totalis etc). My problem is when to reintroduce anything as I don’t appear to have symptoms I can easily monitor for reactions, seeing as phase for normal hair growth is about three months. Any suggestions, other than only introducing one new food every 3-4 months? Many thanks for your invaluable information and help.

    • I recommend paying attention to other signs in your body when you reintroduce a food. Although I have rheumatoid arthritis and joint pain is my main symptom, when I first reintroduce a food, I have pre-symptoms before pain appears: moodiness, insomnia, and digestive distress. You might find that you also have some pre-symptoms that signify intolerance before alopecia would appear. Another suggestion is something I haven’t done personally, but Dr. Terry Wahls recommends. It’s called the pulse test. Here’s a link: http://www.saintcloudchiropractor.com/index.php?p=251865

      • Thank you Eileen, I will give it a try (I tend to have a bit of white-coat syndrome, so suspect my pulse will be very reactive whether it needs to be or not!). I did not experience any noticeable changes on my two years on GAPS, and have not yet on AIP, what would you think would be a reasonable length of time to stick strictly to AIP, without and reintroductions, if I continue to experience no change? Loaded question, I know!

        • How long you wait before reintroductions is really a personal choice. If you’re comfortable on the AIP and don’t find the restrictions stressful, then continuing until you see improvements is ideal. Be sure you’re eating a nutrient-dense version of the AIP – plenty of calories, organ meats, bone broths, seafood, fermented foods, and diverse vegetables. A good part of healing isn’t the food we take out, but the food we add in. If you start to find the AIP food restrictions stressful, that stress can interfere with healing, so reintroductions are wise at that point. Trust your instincts.

  19. I suffer from psoriasis and started the AIP last week after being gluten and dairy free for a year. I’m curious, since I assume there is healing starting, should I expect the itching to subside gradually because there is still permeability and therefore still food particles entering my blood stream? I still find myself itching quite a bit, so another assumption is that even the nutrient dense food will contribute to symptoms until I heal. I know there are alot of AI diseases out there and that everyone is different, but I’m wondering if I should further exclude more foods such as the FODMAPs or just give it more time. Thanks for any input

    • Give it more time. The skin actually takes the longest to heal, because the body heals from the inside out. Wait at least 3 months before troubleshooting further. Good for you for starting!

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